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Silver Fern Immigration India office has become ISO Certified

Written by on March 28th, 2016.      0 comments

We are pleased to announce that Silver Fern Immigration, India office is now awarded with prestigious International Quality Management System Certification. i.e. ISO 9001. The achievement itself is proud for us as it demonstrates our commitment to provide the highest quality services to our clients, with 100% customer satisfaction. ISO 9001 Logo-370
Topics: certified
 

Nursing Education Pathways in New Zealand

Written by on November 17th, 2015.      0 comments

Nursing is a fulfilling and challenging career path. Like most countries, New Zealand has a shortage of qualified and experienced nurses, particularly in the aged care, mental health, and medical sectors. There are different pathways to becoming a registered and qualified nurse in New Zealand.  NZRNmedal Picture

 
 

New Zealand's Economic Outlook: 2015 & Beyond

Written by on November 11th, 2015.      0 comments

Economy Blog Post Image Silver Fern Immigration-01-959-645-596 New Zealand’s economy is growing steadily even amidst economic downturns in other countries. New Zealand’s strength lies in its stable government that is focused on economic growth and development. Over the last five years the country’s government has passed economic reforms to enhance the commercial sector, and enable entrepreneurs to ‘do business’ easier.

New Zealand has recently ranked a close second to Singapore among the best places to do business in the world according to a recent World Bank survey. The tax regime for companies is attractive as are incentives to invest in the country, which includes among the shortest time to set up a business in the developed world, the costs of running a business are low and a social general environment favouring businesses are all responsible for the massive foreign direct investments that the country has attracted in recent years. 

 
 

Looking for Paradise? Move Down Under

Written by on November 6th, 2015.      0 comments

Paradise Silver Fern-01-428 For hundreds and thousands of migrants New Zealand is the land of milk and honey. The country’s respect for individual human rights, stable government, growing economy, harmonious society, and beautiful natural environment has made it one of the best places to live in the world.

 



 
 

What to Look Out For When Choosing an Immigration Adviser

Written by on November 6th, 2015.      0 comments

For many people, the process of immigrating to another country can often feel like a guessing game. There are simply so many factors to consider and options to evaluate and choose from. Immigration advisers can provide you with the important facts that are relevant to you and your individual immigration process; and assist you in the entire visa application process. Admittedly, as with all professions, there have been widely documented cases of rogue adviserswho have quite simply, ripped people off. However, the New Zealand governments introduction of licensing laws in 2009 has helped minimise these cases and aim to protect both migrants and the immigration industry. All immigration advisers are now required to undergo vigorous testing and screening in order to obtain their license and provide immigration advice. Nevertheless, these changes have not deterred some from attempting to breach the law and/or falsely claim to be licensedimmigration advisers. The following are things to consider and signs to look out for when choosing an immigration adviser: 
 

Why Study In "Middle-Earth"?

Written by on October 30th, 2015.      0 comments

Nowadays, New Zealand is best known for rugby, hobbits and as the birth place of singing sensation, Lorde but did you know that it is also home to some of the world’s highest ranked universities and education providers? 



 
 

Their Story: The Van Wyk Family

Written by on September 22nd, 2015.      0 comments

Van Wyk 1-874
Like most South African emigres, Andries and Michelle van Wyk left their home country in search of a ‘safe haven’ - they found it in New Zealand. 
 
Andries and Michelle Van Wyk didn’t think it was possible for them to leave South Africa.

Just the thought of the immigration process was daunting enough.
But on the 12 June 2014, after a fateful job interview via Skype with a New Zealand employer, Andries and Michelle realised that their dream of living in a safer and country was in actual fact, about to come true. 
 

Their Story: The Nagra Family

Written by on September 22nd, 2015.      1 comments

Aman and Armeena Nagra arrived in New Zealand determined to build a brighter future for their young son, in the process they found a place to truly call home
 

When did you and your family arrive in New Zealand? 
Aman arrived in New Zealand in July 2010 - as an international student. Aarmeena and Sarjeet arrived in March 2011.

Why did you and your family decide to move to New Zealand? 
Both Aman’s brothers were in Australia. Aman thought that he would try his luck in New Zealand. We were both stressed out about our son’s future [in India]. Finding employment was a struggle and the systems in our country were not keeping up.

We wanted our child to have a fair and good life. We wanted him to learn about honest and fair dealings and prevent him from being exposed to the corrupt practices [in India]. Aman, being a lover of nature, preferred to explore the beauty of New Zealand.

Nagra 1-410-531-351
 

Engineering Jobs in New Zealand: How to Get Them & What you Need to Know

Written by on September 7th, 2015.      0 comments

10359014 10152341537497696 8057323741654236520 o-223-33

For many migrants across the world, New Zealand represents a utopian society in the middle of the pacific ocean.

Perhaps, in some respects it is. One thing is certain though, New Zealand is a growing nation, and like all growing nations it is calling out for skilled, experienced and qualified engineers. 

 

Teaching Young Kiwis: Sara's Story

Written by Dominey Flores, on February 24th, 2015.      0 comments

 
IMG 0464-685 We had the pleasure of assisting Sara, in July 2014. She had approached Silver Fern Immigration at the recommendation of her work colleague - a former client of ours. Unlike, most of our clients, Sara had actually grown up in New Zealand.

She attended secondary/high school in New Zealand as an 'exchange/international student', and eventually went on to complete her Bachelor of Education at the University of Auckland. Sara now works as an Early Childhood Education Teacher in the Auckland suburb of Pakuranga. We are very pleased to say that Sara was granted her Resident Visa in December 2014 a few days before Christmas and - just four months after we submitted her application. We caught up with Sara a couple of weeks ago to gain some more insight into her background and thoughts on New Zealand. 

 
 

Q&A in a Second with Justin Webb and Justin Newton

Written by Dominey Flores on April 4th, 2014.      0 comments

Justin Webb and Justin Newton are among our successful clients who have made New Zealand their permanent home. They were granted residence in February 2014. We wish them all the best for their future endeavours! 
 

We have Moved!

Written by on February 25th, 2014.      0 comments

Silver Fern Immigration Services has moved to the bustling, idyllic coastal village of Howick, East Auckland.
 

Brian Heron & Amy Hudson: the Beachy Life

Written by Dominey Flores on December 13th, 2013.      1 comments

BRIAN AND AMY 2(copy)(copy) Brian Heron and Amy Hudson arrived in New Zealand in the middle of February 2013. The couple packed up their belongings and said goodbye to their life in Portsmouth, United Kingdom in search of a better lifestyle that complimented their ‘work to live’ philosophy. Choosing New Zealand as their new home was a no brainer for Brian and Amy; the couple had been to the country on three week long holiday in 2012 and had fallen in love with the relaxed pace of living. 

 
 

Daniel & Rebecca Burdett: Living it Up Under the Kiwi Sun

Written by Dominey Flores on November 15th, 2013.      0 comments

Daniel and Rebecca in Queenstown Like an increasing number of professionals from the United Kingdom, Daniel and Rebecca Burdett came to New Zealand in search of more sunshine and a better way of life. The couple had visited New Zealand on a five week long holiday and had fallen in love with the beautiful scenery, the people, and secure and stable social environment. 
 

Why I Moved to NZ - Erica's Story

Written by Erica Nothnagel on September 19th, 2013.      1 comments

Like so many expats who choose to live here, I came to New Zealand in search of security and a better future for my family. It had become frighteningly clear that the crime in South Africa was on a steep incline; and the metal bars that adorned every window in our house was not (and should not) indicate a ‘normal’ part of everyday life.  The constant fear and paranoia that dominated the cities, towns, and farms had become stifling. Nobody was safe from the very real possibility of rape, home invasion, armed robbery, farm seizures, assault, and murder. In hindsight, it astounds and appals me to recall that our home had been robbed approximately eight times; we had been asleep in the house during one incident and awakened the following morning to a bare living room.  Incidents such as this were considered normal and inevitable occurrences.

Our Journey Begins
My sister in-law’s fateful visit to New Zealand was the catalyst behind our decision to leave South Africa. The brochures she brought back with her depicted New Zealand as an idyllic country that offered vast opportunities and a brighter future for my sons.  She used adjectives such as ‘safe’, ‘secure’, ‘clean’ and ‘friendly’ to describe this country that we knew very little about; but was enough to persuade my husband and I join them in their exodus out of Africa. In 2003, my family and I boarded the plane to New Zealand and have not looked back since.

Erica
Erica Nothnagel
(Licensed Immigration Adviser)

Keeping the Faith
Our first year was rife with ‘settling in’ hurdles. I can empathise with every migrant who has experienced frustration over the delayed arrival of furniture or living in a house overcrowded with fellow newcomers, or doubt and stress over the process of finding employment and adjusting to a completely new culture. Nevertheless, we soldiered on, confident in the knowledge that we had made the right decision to come here. Each day we are constantly reminded of how fortunate we are to be here in this amazing country that is of course, not without its imperfections.

New Zealand a Utopia?
I remember one of the first things I noticed upon arrival in New Zealand was the calm and relaxed atmosphere that appears to blanket the entire country. There is no sense of immediate danger lurking just around the corner. No feeling of being watched from a distance. I do not get the panicky urge to tighten my grip on my handbag when I am out and about in public. The people here are friendly, and as one of my clients put it: they smile so genuinely. There are no bars on any of the windows of our house or office. Police do not carry guns. The traffic laws are actually enforced. We can leave our windows open at night. I feel safe. In fact, I am safe or as safe as anyone can possibly be in civilised society. It takes living in a country where the word ‘safety’ is a goal rather than a normal state of living to truly appreciate how safe New Zealand is. Of course, crime does still exist: there is organised crime, a serious methamphetamine problem, houses are robbed, there are still murders, and rape, but nowhere near on the scale that I was accustomed to in South Africa. Crime or the threat of becoming a victim of it does not govern everyday life. People do not wake up in the morning thinking, “Well today could be the day that I am killed in an armed robbery, or hijacked in my car”. In this country, that kind of mentality is classified as paranoia.

The Pros of Living in New Zealand 
One of the major positives that come with living here is the close proximity to and abundance of natural attractions. Regardless of where you live in New Zealand, it is guaranteed that you will be only one hours’ drive from the nearest beach and national park which are free to explore. Over the last decade New Zealand has fast become known as the world’s best kept secret – an adventure playground for nature lovers and adrenaline junkies. It is land of dramatic and beautiful contrasts that never ceases to impress and inspire.

Another thing that I appreciate about New Zealand is the political transparency. Corruption is almost non-existent and government officials who choose to participate in it are crucified by the media and the public. Politicians are constantly held accountable for their actions or lack thereof. Dictatorship, civil war, and religious conflict are vague concepts that are used to describe the problems of far off countries.  New Zealand holds one of the best track records for honouring human rights laws and peaceful relations with other nations; and politics is governed by social accountability and legal constraints. The only downside to New Zealand politics that I can think of is the rigidity of its political correctness.The government support that is given to students is another benefit of being a resident or citizen here. Interest free student loans and allowances are almost unheard of in most countries but in New Zealand financial support is provided to students who would otherwise not be able to afford a tertiary education. A strong emphasis is placed on up-skilling and equipping school leavers with qualifications that will enable them to contribute positively to the employment sector and the economy; and in spite of recent government budget cuts, financial support to students remains high on the governments’ initiatives.

Balancing the Cons 
Paradoxically, the continued emphasis on up-skilling and education is highlighted against the backdrop of an economy that has been hit hard by the ‘global recession’. For some, the current economic climate may prove to be a downside of setting up base in New Zealand. Local businesses have suffered the brunt of the recession, with many closing their doors and/or making staff cuts. The GST rise has also signalled an increase in prices of consumer goods and services, and household costs have risen due to a higher Official Cash rate. Nevertheless, the job market continues to improve – albeit slowly – with a major demand for experienced and highly skilled professionals in the IT and automotive industries. Overall, I would say that the economy is the major concern on most New Zealander’s list, but in spite of the economic knockbacks, the country continues to grow and develop. There are various industries that have yet to be explored here and I foresee a positive future for New Zealand’s economy.

Taking all of the above into consideration, New Zealand is a country with imperfections that pale in comparison to the woes of other nations. Although, I find the current economic climate worrying it is by no means irreparable; nor does it outweigh the positive aspects of living here.  My family and I arrived in this country with the aim of attaining a better future and quality of life. We have achieved all of that and more.


By Erica Nothnagel
Founder & Managing Director of Silver Fern Immigration
 
 

 
Email me when new posts are made to this blog

Silver Fern Immigration India office has become ISO Certified

Written by on March 28th, 2016.      0 comments

We are pleased to announce that Silver Fern Immigration, India office is now awarded with prestigious International Quality Management System Certification. i.e. ISO 9001. The achievement itself is proud for us as it demonstrates our commitment to provide the highest quality services to our clients, with 100% customer satisfaction. ISO 9001 Logo-370
Topics: certified
 

Nursing Education Pathways in New Zealand

Written by on November 17th, 2015.      0 comments

Nursing is a fulfilling and challenging career path. Like most countries, New Zealand has a shortage of qualified and experienced nurses, particularly in the aged care, mental health, and medical sectors. There are different pathways to becoming a registered and qualified nurse in New Zealand.  NZRNmedal Picture

 
 

New Zealand's Economic Outlook: 2015 & Beyond

Written by on November 11th, 2015.      0 comments

Economy Blog Post Image Silver Fern Immigration-01-959-645-596 New Zealand’s economy is growing steadily even amidst economic downturns in other countries. New Zealand’s strength lies in its stable government that is focused on economic growth and development. Over the last five years the country’s government has passed economic reforms to enhance the commercial sector, and enable entrepreneurs to ‘do business’ easier.

New Zealand has recently ranked a close second to Singapore among the best places to do business in the world according to a recent World Bank survey. The tax regime for companies is attractive as are incentives to invest in the country, which includes among the shortest time to set up a business in the developed world, the costs of running a business are low and a social general environment favouring businesses are all responsible for the massive foreign direct investments that the country has attracted in recent years. 

 
 

Looking for Paradise? Move Down Under

Written by on November 6th, 2015.      0 comments

Paradise Silver Fern-01-428 For hundreds and thousands of migrants New Zealand is the land of milk and honey. The country’s respect for individual human rights, stable government, growing economy, harmonious society, and beautiful natural environment has made it one of the best places to live in the world.

 



 
 

What to Look Out For When Choosing an Immigration Adviser

Written by on November 6th, 2015.      0 comments

For many people, the process of immigrating to another country can often feel like a guessing game. There are simply so many factors to consider and options to evaluate and choose from. Immigration advisers can provide you with the important facts that are relevant to you and your individual immigration process; and assist you in the entire visa application process. Admittedly, as with all professions, there have been widely documented cases of rogue adviserswho have quite simply, ripped people off. However, the New Zealand governments introduction of licensing laws in 2009 has helped minimise these cases and aim to protect both migrants and the immigration industry. All immigration advisers are now required to undergo vigorous testing and screening in order to obtain their license and provide immigration advice. Nevertheless, these changes have not deterred some from attempting to breach the law and/or falsely claim to be licensedimmigration advisers. The following are things to consider and signs to look out for when choosing an immigration adviser: 
 

Why Study In "Middle-Earth"?

Written by on October 30th, 2015.      0 comments

Nowadays, New Zealand is best known for rugby, hobbits and as the birth place of singing sensation, Lorde but did you know that it is also home to some of the world’s highest ranked universities and education providers? 



 
 

Their Story: The Van Wyk Family

Written by on September 22nd, 2015.      0 comments

Van Wyk 1-874
Like most South African emigres, Andries and Michelle van Wyk left their home country in search of a ‘safe haven’ - they found it in New Zealand. 
 
Andries and Michelle Van Wyk didn’t think it was possible for them to leave South Africa.

Just the thought of the immigration process was daunting enough.
But on the 12 June 2014, after a fateful job interview via Skype with a New Zealand employer, Andries and Michelle realised that their dream of living in a safer and country was in actual fact, about to come true. 
 

Their Story: The Nagra Family

Written by on September 22nd, 2015.      1 comments

Aman and Armeena Nagra arrived in New Zealand determined to build a brighter future for their young son, in the process they found a place to truly call home
 

When did you and your family arrive in New Zealand? 
Aman arrived in New Zealand in July 2010 - as an international student. Aarmeena and Sarjeet arrived in March 2011.

Why did you and your family decide to move to New Zealand? 
Both Aman’s brothers were in Australia. Aman thought that he would try his luck in New Zealand. We were both stressed out about our son’s future [in India]. Finding employment was a struggle and the systems in our country were not keeping up.

We wanted our child to have a fair and good life. We wanted him to learn about honest and fair dealings and prevent him from being exposed to the corrupt practices [in India]. Aman, being a lover of nature, preferred to explore the beauty of New Zealand.

Nagra 1-410-531-351
 

Engineering Jobs in New Zealand: How to Get Them & What you Need to Know

Written by on September 7th, 2015.      0 comments

10359014 10152341537497696 8057323741654236520 o-223-33

For many migrants across the world, New Zealand represents a utopian society in the middle of the pacific ocean.

Perhaps, in some respects it is. One thing is certain though, New Zealand is a growing nation, and like all growing nations it is calling out for skilled, experienced and qualified engineers. 

 

Teaching Young Kiwis: Sara's Story

Written by Dominey Flores, on February 24th, 2015.      0 comments

 
IMG 0464-685 We had the pleasure of assisting Sara, in July 2014. She had approached Silver Fern Immigration at the recommendation of her work colleague - a former client of ours. Unlike, most of our clients, Sara had actually grown up in New Zealand.

She attended secondary/high school in New Zealand as an 'exchange/international student', and eventually went on to complete her Bachelor of Education at the University of Auckland. Sara now works as an Early Childhood Education Teacher in the Auckland suburb of Pakuranga. We are very pleased to say that Sara was granted her Resident Visa in December 2014 a few days before Christmas and - just four months after we submitted her application. We caught up with Sara a couple of weeks ago to gain some more insight into her background and thoughts on New Zealand. 

 
 

Q&A in a Second with Justin Webb and Justin Newton

Written by Dominey Flores on April 4th, 2014.      0 comments

Justin Webb and Justin Newton are among our successful clients who have made New Zealand their permanent home. They were granted residence in February 2014. We wish them all the best for their future endeavours! 
 

We have Moved!

Written by on February 25th, 2014.      0 comments

Silver Fern Immigration Services has moved to the bustling, idyllic coastal village of Howick, East Auckland.
 

Brian Heron & Amy Hudson: the Beachy Life

Written by Dominey Flores on December 13th, 2013.      1 comments

BRIAN AND AMY 2(copy)(copy) Brian Heron and Amy Hudson arrived in New Zealand in the middle of February 2013. The couple packed up their belongings and said goodbye to their life in Portsmouth, United Kingdom in search of a better lifestyle that complimented their ‘work to live’ philosophy. Choosing New Zealand as their new home was a no brainer for Brian and Amy; the couple had been to the country on three week long holiday in 2012 and had fallen in love with the relaxed pace of living. 

 
 

Daniel & Rebecca Burdett: Living it Up Under the Kiwi Sun

Written by Dominey Flores on November 15th, 2013.      0 comments

Daniel and Rebecca in Queenstown Like an increasing number of professionals from the United Kingdom, Daniel and Rebecca Burdett came to New Zealand in search of more sunshine and a better way of life. The couple had visited New Zealand on a five week long holiday and had fallen in love with the beautiful scenery, the people, and secure and stable social environment. 
 

Why I Moved to NZ - Erica's Story

Written by Erica Nothnagel on September 19th, 2013.      1 comments

Like so many expats who choose to live here, I came to New Zealand in search of security and a better future for my family. It had become frighteningly clear that the crime in South Africa was on a steep incline; and the metal bars that adorned every window in our house was not (and should not) indicate a ‘normal’ part of everyday life.  The constant fear and paranoia that dominated the cities, towns, and farms had become stifling. Nobody was safe from the very real possibility of rape, home invasion, armed robbery, farm seizures, assault, and murder. In hindsight, it astounds and appals me to recall that our home had been robbed approximately eight times; we had been asleep in the house during one incident and awakened the following morning to a bare living room.  Incidents such as this were considered normal and inevitable occurrences.

Our Journey Begins
My sister in-law’s fateful visit to New Zealand was the catalyst behind our decision to leave South Africa. The brochures she brought back with her depicted New Zealand as an idyllic country that offered vast opportunities and a brighter future for my sons.  She used adjectives such as ‘safe’, ‘secure’, ‘clean’ and ‘friendly’ to describe this country that we knew very little about; but was enough to persuade my husband and I join them in their exodus out of Africa. In 2003, my family and I boarded the plane to New Zealand and have not looked back since.

Erica
Erica Nothnagel
(Licensed Immigration Adviser)

Keeping the Faith
Our first year was rife with ‘settling in’ hurdles. I can empathise with every migrant who has experienced frustration over the delayed arrival of furniture or living in a house overcrowded with fellow newcomers, or doubt and stress over the process of finding employment and adjusting to a completely new culture. Nevertheless, we soldiered on, confident in the knowledge that we had made the right decision to come here. Each day we are constantly reminded of how fortunate we are to be here in this amazing country that is of course, not without its imperfections.

New Zealand a Utopia?
I remember one of the first things I noticed upon arrival in New Zealand was the calm and relaxed atmosphere that appears to blanket the entire country. There is no sense of immediate danger lurking just around the corner. No feeling of being watched from a distance. I do not get the panicky urge to tighten my grip on my handbag when I am out and about in public. The people here are friendly, and as one of my clients put it: they smile so genuinely. There are no bars on any of the windows of our house or office. Police do not carry guns. The traffic laws are actually enforced. We can leave our windows open at night. I feel safe. In fact, I am safe or as safe as anyone can possibly be in civilised society. It takes living in a country where the word ‘safety’ is a goal rather than a normal state of living to truly appreciate how safe New Zealand is. Of course, crime does still exist: there is organised crime, a serious methamphetamine problem, houses are robbed, there are still murders, and rape, but nowhere near on the scale that I was accustomed to in South Africa. Crime or the threat of becoming a victim of it does not govern everyday life. People do not wake up in the morning thinking, “Well today could be the day that I am killed in an armed robbery, or hijacked in my car”. In this country, that kind of mentality is classified as paranoia.

The Pros of Living in New Zealand 
One of the major positives that come with living here is the close proximity to and abundance of natural attractions. Regardless of where you live in New Zealand, it is guaranteed that you will be only one hours’ drive from the nearest beach and national park which are free to explore. Over the last decade New Zealand has fast become known as the world’s best kept secret – an adventure playground for nature lovers and adrenaline junkies. It is land of dramatic and beautiful contrasts that never ceases to impress and inspire.

Another thing that I appreciate about New Zealand is the political transparency. Corruption is almost non-existent and government officials who choose to participate in it are crucified by the media and the public. Politicians are constantly held accountable for their actions or lack thereof. Dictatorship, civil war, and religious conflict are vague concepts that are used to describe the problems of far off countries.  New Zealand holds one of the best track records for honouring human rights laws and peaceful relations with other nations; and politics is governed by social accountability and legal constraints. The only downside to New Zealand politics that I can think of is the rigidity of its political correctness.The government support that is given to students is another benefit of being a resident or citizen here. Interest free student loans and allowances are almost unheard of in most countries but in New Zealand financial support is provided to students who would otherwise not be able to afford a tertiary education. A strong emphasis is placed on up-skilling and equipping school leavers with qualifications that will enable them to contribute positively to the employment sector and the economy; and in spite of recent government budget cuts, financial support to students remains high on the governments’ initiatives.

Balancing the Cons 
Paradoxically, the continued emphasis on up-skilling and education is highlighted against the backdrop of an economy that has been hit hard by the ‘global recession’. For some, the current economic climate may prove to be a downside of setting up base in New Zealand. Local businesses have suffered the brunt of the recession, with many closing their doors and/or making staff cuts. The GST rise has also signalled an increase in prices of consumer goods and services, and household costs have risen due to a higher Official Cash rate. Nevertheless, the job market continues to improve – albeit slowly – with a major demand for experienced and highly skilled professionals in the IT and automotive industries. Overall, I would say that the economy is the major concern on most New Zealander’s list, but in spite of the economic knockbacks, the country continues to grow and develop. There are various industries that have yet to be explored here and I foresee a positive future for New Zealand’s economy.

Taking all of the above into consideration, New Zealand is a country with imperfections that pale in comparison to the woes of other nations. Although, I find the current economic climate worrying it is by no means irreparable; nor does it outweigh the positive aspects of living here.  My family and I arrived in this country with the aim of attaining a better future and quality of life. We have achieved all of that and more.


By Erica Nothnagel
Founder & Managing Director of Silver Fern Immigration
 
 

 

CONTACT US

P :   (+64) 9 377 8587   
E:     team@sfimmigration.co.nz

Please note that consultations are by appointment only.  Consultation charges apply. 


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Level 4, 53 Fort Street
Auckland CBD
Auckland 1010
New Zealand

Entrance at 53 Fort Street or 68 Shortland Street
 

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